To top
Hide Show Categories

Gazelle Sports

  • Top Ten Foods for Athletes

    By Kimberly J. Mueller; MS, RD, SDTC Sports Nutritionist Whether you are training for a marathon, getting dirty riding a muddy single track or surfing some beautiful waves, the food you feed your body will dictate how well you will perform. While supplements seem like an easy solution, research supports the notion that whole foods are still the best source of the nutrients you will need for optimal
    health and peak performance. Below I have listen the top ten foods for runners. Eat up!!!

    1. Go Red!!! Lycopene, a vitamin-like substance that makes tomatoes and watermelon red, has potent antioxidant qualities that help reduce some of the cellular damage that occurs to activate muscles during exercise. Lycopene has also been shown to reduce the risk for prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, and other cancers too (particular breast and cervical cancer). The highest does and best absorbed form of lycopene is found in processed tomato products, such as tomato sauce or tomato soup. So the eating of spaghetti and pizza should be encouraged in the name of good health. Extra sauce please!
    2. Get into the Swim of Seafood!!! Seafood is high in protein and zinc. Zinc is important for immune function and also helps clear carbon dioxide out of our muscles to help enhance recovery from intense exercise. Cold-water fish, including salmon, herring, mackerel, and sardines are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids which are effective in lowering risk for heart disease and may help boost fat burning. Most health professionals recommend at least 2-3 fish meals each to reap the benefits of seafood! If you don’t like seafood, omega-3 fatty acids can also be found in canola, flax seed and soybean oils, as well as walnuts.
    3. Bring on the Broccoli!!! Is a nagging cold compromising your performance? Rich in vitamin C, broccoli may help boost your immune system, helping to prevent unwanted illness during training. Broccoli is also an excellent source of calcium and potassium, which help to maintain strong bones and contribute to healthy connective tissue and cartilage. Put chopped broccoli on pizza, in spaghetti sauces, in stir fries, and in salads to help maintain peak immune function during season.
    4. Energize with Asparagus!!! Asparagus is low in calories, contains no cholesterol or fat, and is an excellent source of thiamin, which aids in the conversion of glucose into energy and also helps synthesize and breakdown amino acids. Add a healthy ration of asparagus spears to your meal or snack as means to help boost performance.
    5. Soybeans (edamame)!!! Rich in complex carbohydrates and protein, soybeans have been touted as the perfect recovery food. Soy is the only complete plant source of protein, containing all the amino acids necessary for repairing and building muscle. In addition, soy contains disease-fighting phytochemicals and appetite-surpressing unsaturated fats. Soy can also be implemented in the diet in the form of tofu, textured soy protein, tempeh, soy milk, soy flour, soy nut butter and soy nuts.
    6. Sow your Oats!!! Starting your day off with a bowl of oatmeal will help sustain your energy levels as well as maximize your glycogen stores for peak endurance performance. Oatmeal is also an excellent source of B-vitamins (for stress and energy production) and contains a significant amount of zinc for immune function. My favorite oatmeal concoction is as follows: Mix ½ cup old fashioned oats with ¼ cut natural granola. Add 1 handful of favorite fruit and 1 handful of almond or walnuts. Pour over 1 cup of nonfat milk and cook mixture in microwave for 2-3 minutes.
    7. Bone Up on Calcium!!! As a good source of both calcium and vitamin D, milk is most commonly marketed as a bone builder. Milk is also an excellent source of low-glycemic carbohydrates and is a complete protein source making it a great pre- or post-workout snack option. In addition, calcium is crucial for proper muscle function; cramping may incur with a deficiency. Blend low-fat milk with yogurt and fruit for a delicious, nutrient-rich smoothie.
    8. Boost Endurance with Raw Honey!!! A recent study performed at the University of Memphis Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory showed that the blend of sugars found in raw honey can significantly increase an athlete’s average power and endurance. In its natural state, raw honey is an immediate source of energy, full of B-complex vitamins, amino acids, and enzymes. Add honey to toast, cereal, tea for added sweetness and a quick boost of energy.
    9. Go Nuts!!! Eaten raw, nuts are a great source of vitamin E. Adequate vitamin E helps with heart health and also helps reduce some of that damage that occurs to our muscles during exercise. Nuts are also filling and satisfying because of their healthy monounsaturated fat content. Try a little raw nut butter on a piece of whole wheat bread with a half of banana sliced up on top. It’s delicious!
    10. The Bold and the Blue. A 1/2 cup and a mere 40 calories later, you get a hefty 2.5 grams of fiber as well as a significant amount of vitamin C, which is a potent antioxidant that keeps our immune system running at its peak. Blueberries have the highest ORAC score (oxygen radical absorbency capacity) of any fresh fruit, which means they can destroy free radicals in the body before they cause damage to our healthy cells. In addition, the dye that makes blueberries "blue" have been shown to improve memory, balance and coordination. So the next time you are at the store, be bold and buy blue. Blueberries are a tasty addition to cereals, salads and smoothies.
    Read More
  • 100 Calorie Snacks

    Cherries: 1 Cup

    100% Fruit Juice: 6 oz

    Raw Vegetables: 3 cups of almost all types of vegetables

    Salad: 1 ¼ pound bag (pre-cut)

    Apple: 1 Medium Size 3 inches

    Strawberries: 2 Whole Cups Sliced up

    Orange: 1 Large

    Blueberries: 1 ¼ Cup

    Grapefruit: 2 Large Grapefruits Plain

    Watermelon: 1 ½ Wedges

    Low-fat Milk: 1 cup (8oz) low fat is 1%, ½ % and skim

    Banana: Medium Size

    Yogurt: 4 oz

    Reduced Fat Triscuits: 6

    Reduced Fat Wheat Thins: 13

    Graham Crackers: 2 Sheets

    Saltines: 6

    Air-popped Popcorn: 3 Cups

    Pretzels: 12 to 15 individual

    Cheerios/Kix/Rice Krispies/Special K: 1 Cup

    Raisin Bran/Shredded Wheat/Bran Flakes: ½ Cup

    Oatmeal (plain): ½ Cup or 1 Packet

    Peanuts Dry Roasted: 19 Individual nuts

    Trail Mix (nut/raisin/chocolate mix): 2 ½ tablespoons

    Hershey Kisses: 3 individual kisses

    Jell-O Fat Free Pudding Cups: 1 Cup

    Almonds: 10 individual almonds

    Jelly Beans Sugar Free: 45 individual pieces

    Gummy Bears: 12 individual pieces

    Chocolate Chip Cookies: 2 Medium Sized

    Read More
  • Eating for the Long Run

    It comes as no surprise that providing your body with the proper nutrition while training for a marathon will help optimize your running performance. We know that good nutrition will help your body to “run” more efficient, enhance your overall health and immune system, aid in preventing/healing injuries, improve your body’s adaptation to training as well as promote speedy recovery. The food you eat and the way you eat it will indeed dictate how well you run! But with so much information out there it can be hard to know what to do and when to do it! Below are some basic recommendations to help you fuel your body for peak running performance. Use this information to guide you, but don’t be ultra concerned about all the details so much that you don’t enjoy eating!!!!! After all we run to eat! Or do we eat to run? Remember what might work for one person, may not work for you. Try to remember that just like running should be fun, eating should be fun too! Practice, practice, practice during your long runs to see what does and doesn't work for you and than follow that on race day!

    BASIC GUIDELINES: Endurance runners should aim for a diet high in carbohydrates (60-70%), moderate in protein (12-20%) and low in fat (20-25%). Food choices should include foods from all the 5 food groups: Grains, Vegetables, Fruits, Milk/dairy and Meat/Beans. Calories should be spread evenly throughout the day (no skipping meals, especially breakfast which is the MOST important meal of the day), eating 3-6 times per day. Women should aim for 2,000 to 3,500 calories/day, men should aim for 2,500-4,000 calories per day. On rest days and shorter run days, aim for the lower end of the calories; on long run days shoot for the upper range.

    CARBOHYDRATE: is truly a runner’s best friend because it serves as the primary energy source for working muscles and helps the body to use fat more efficiently. Carbs also help to maintain optimal blood sugars levels. Carbs are stored in the muscles as glycogen, which is the primary fuel you need to keep MOVING. When glycogen stores start to diminish, so do you. This is when exercise intensity reduces and you start to feel pain, cramping and sluggishness known as “The WALL” take place. This will usually happen after about 90 minutes to 2 hours of running. Going out too fast too soon will also contribute to the deletion of glycogen stores. Therefore, training you body with running as well as carb intake will help avoid hitting the wall. Carbohydrate is also the source of many photochemicals and antioxidants which help us repair, recover, maintain a healthy immune system and prevent/heal an injury. Therefore a diet high in carbs is essential for long distance running performance. Examples of good sources to fuel your body are: pasta, rice, potatoes, cereal, fruit, vegetables, some low fat/fat free dairy products and whole grain product. Remember that 60-70% of your diet should be coming from these carbohydrate sources. One of the rewards of running is being able to sneak in a few sweets/treats now and then. But make sure you avoid “living” off from junk food as your main carb source because these carbs are virtually nutrient free and could end up harming your training efforts. To help figure out the amount that’s right for you, multiply your weight in pounds by 3.2 to give you the number of grams of carbohydrates you should consume per day.

    Examples include:

    • 15 grams of carb=1/2 cup cooked rice or pasta & 1 serving of fruit, 1⁄2 cup of starchy vegetables or 1⁄2 cup dried beans.
    • 12 grams of carb= 1 cup of low fat milk or yogurt or 1.5 oz of cheese
    • 5 grams of carb= 1 cup leafy raw vegetables or 1⁄2 cup chopped vegetables

    PROTEIN: is used to build and repair body tissues including muscles, tendons and ligaments. Protein is NOT a primary source of energy for long distance runners. Your body can only use so much at one time, any excess may be converted to fat. 12-20% of your diet should come from protein. To figure out the amount for you, multiply your weight in pounds by .6 to calculate the number of grams of protein you should consume per day.   

    Examples include:

    • 21 grams of protein: 3 oz lean meat, poultry or fish provides
    • 8 grams of protein: One cup of low fat milk or yogurt provides
    • 7 grams of protein: 1⁄2 cup cooked beans, 1 ounce of cheese, 1 egg, 4 oz of tofu or 2 T peanut butter
    • 3 grams of protein: A serving of whole grain product (i.e. 1⁄2 cup cereal, 1 slice of bread)

    FAT: helps a runner sustain prolonged exercise. It is also an energy source that insulates the body against cold as well as helps protect and cushion vital organs. Limit fat for pre run/pre race meals as it exits the stomach slowly and my cause cramping. Fat burns better when combined with carbohydrates. There are three kinds of fat. Saturated fats include: butter, hydrogenated oils, coconut oil and palm oil. Polyunsaturated fats include: corn oil, soybean oil and margarine. Monounsaturated fats include: olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil and are the preferred fat. Peanuts butter (natural) is a good source of monounsaturated fat. Approximately 20-25% of your diet should come from fat, 10% coming from saturated fat.

    FLUIDS: Marathon runners are at risk for dehydration, and hyponatrimia (low blood sodium levels, a dangerous but easily preventable condition). Dehydration can bring on fatigue, cramps and impair performance. If you drink too much and aren't properly replacing your electrolytes you lose in sweat you are at risk for hyponatremia (low sodium levels) which can produce symptoms such a nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness, headache, disorientation and bloating in face and hands. In general water is sufficient for any runs under one hour.    Any runs 60-90 minutes or longer generally require more than water (i.e. Gatorade, Ultima, Endurox R4). To figure out your basic fluid needs take 1⁄2 your body weight (lbs) in fluid ounces. (140 # person would require 70 oz/day)

    BASIC GUIDELINES BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER RUNNING:

    Before: A meal or snack should provide sufficient fluid to maintain hydration, be fairly low in fat and fiber to aid in bowel elimination and minimize any GI distress, be relatively high in carbohydrate to help maintain blood glucose, be moderate in protein. Choose foods that are familiar and well tolerated, avoid unfamiliar foods. Drink 14-22 oz of fluid 2-3 hours before a long run and another 7-10 oz 10-20 minutes before the run.

     

    Pre Race Snacks:

    • 1 small bagel +2 tbsp peanut butter + 1 small banana.
    • 4 oz juice, 8 oz yogurt, 2 slices toast.
    • 1 1⁄2 cup ready to eat cereal or 1 cup oatmeal + 1⁄2 cup skim milk + 1 fruit.
    • 1 fruit cereal bar + 4 oz juice

    During: The primary goals for nutrient consumption are to replace fluid losses and provide carbohydrate (approximately 30-60 grams per hour) for the maintenance of blood glucose levels and to keep muscles primed. 6-12 oz of fluid should be consumed every 15-20 minutes depending on tolerance. Race snacks: gels, cliff shots, bananas, oranges, Fig Newton’s, graham crackers, pretzels, Jelly beans or fruit chews, granola bars, rice crispy squares, raisins.

    After: The dietary goal is to provide adequate energy and carbohydrates to replace muscle glycogen and to ensure rapid recovery. Carbohydrate intake of 1.5 grams/kg body weight during the first 30 minutes (approximately) 60-100 grams carb) will be adequate to replace glycogen stores. Protein consumed after exercise will provide amino acids for the building and repair of muscle tissue. Runners should consume a mixed meal providing carbs, protein and fat soon after a long run/marathon. Drink enough fluids to replace sweat losses during exercise. Drink at least 16-24 ounces of fluid for every pound of body weight lost during exercise.

     

    Recovery Snacks:

    • Fruit smoothie: 1 cup skim milk, 1 small banana, 1 cup frozen berries.
    • 1 cup cottage cheese w/fruit and 1 cup grapes and 1 cup orange juice.
    • 1 cup low fat chocolate milk, gram crackers and peanut butter.
    • Baked potato with low fat cheese.
    • Pasta with low fat meat/cheese.

    Good eating habits are a lot like good training habits. Remember the big picture: don’t get caught up in the day to day things. A treat in your diet from time to time won’t harm your performance just like taking a break from your training schedule once in a while. In the long “run”, relax, have fun, be consistent, learn what works for you and above all, have fun running and ENJOY YOUR FOOD!

    Sources: Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance, Gatorade Sports Science Institute, National Athletic Trainers Association, USDA My pyramid, Cool Running, Runners world, and American College of Sports Medicine.

    Read More
  • Fluid Replacement

    Type of Event Timing of Consumption Amount & Type of Beverage

    Sports or exercise
    less than 1 hour in duration
    Before: 24 hours Drink adequate fluids
    2 hours 16 oz. (2 cups) cold water
    5-10 minutes 8-6 oz. (1-2 cups) cold water
    During: Every 15-20 minutes 8-10 oz. (1-1 1/4 cups) cold water
    Recovery: Over next 24 hours Adequate fluid to replace losses

    Sports or exercise
    from 1-4 hours in
    duration
    Before: 24 hours Drink adequate fluids
    2 hours 16 oz. (2 cups) glucose electrolyte
    solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    5-10 minutes 8-6 oz.(1-2 cups) glucose electrolyte
    solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    During: Every 15-20 minutes 8-10 oz. (1-1 1/4 cups) glucose electrolyte solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    Recovery: Immediately after
    exercise & every 2 hours for 6-8
    hours following exercise
    Glucose electrolyte solution or glucose
    polymer solution to provide 1gram
    carb/kg body wt.
    Read More
  • Cold Weather Running Tips

    Winter Weather Running Tips

    1. Dress in layers - Choose a highly breathable base layer.  This is what you should wear the closest to your skin.  A wicking material will move the moisture away from your skin, making you feel more comfortable on your run. Wear a looser, second layer of breathable material. Fleece would be a good choice for this layer on a cold day. This adds insulation between your base layer and outer layer. The outer layer should be breathable, wind-resistant and water resistant material.
    2. Wear a hat - Your uncovered head is responsible for 40% of heat loss. Try wearing a head band if a hat feels too hot.
    3. Protect your hands - Mittens are warmer than gloves because the body heat from the other fingers warm each other.
    4. Wear warm socks - Socks made of synthetic fibers wick moisture away from your skin.  Smartwool socks are a great option. Never wear cotton socks!
    5. Shoes - YakTrax are a great investment for winter running.  These are like snow tires for your shoes.
    6. Don’t forget the sunscreen - The sun is still strong, even in the winter.
    7. Wear reflective clothing - Buy clothing with the reflective material already on it.  Extra reflective gear is always a good idea. The more visible you are, the safer you are.  Vests, arm bands and blinking lights are great choices.
    8. Don't overdress - Dress like it is 20 degrees warmer than it really is.  You will warm up after you get moving.

    Winter Gear Ideas

    1. Base layer (moisure-moving to add comfort and warmth)
    2. Thermal layer (add warmth - weight of thermal layer depends on warmth of runner)
    3. Jacket or vest (windproof, water resistant)
    4. Reflective gear or blinking lights (visibility and safety)
    5. Compression tights (try CWX Compression Insulator or Saucony Amp Pro)
    6. Warm tights or pants (consider fleece lined or polyester)
    7. Windproof underwear
    8. Arm warmers
    9. Head gear (hat, headband, headlamp)
    10. Neck gator or Buff (multifunctional- warmth and breathing ease in coldest temps)
    11. Mittens or Gloves (some are reflective)
    12. Moisture-moving socks (wool, polyester)
    13. Compression socks or leg sleeves (great for running and recovery)
    14. YakTrax or StabilIcers
    15. Body Glide or Sport Wax (prevent chaffing/chapping)
    16. Hydration belt
    17. The Stick
    18. Runners Shoe ID Tag
    Read More
  • Hot Weather Running Tips

    1. Clothing - Choose light-colored, loose fitting synthetic fabrics.  This fabric wicks the moisture away from your skin so you have a more comfortable run.  It also helps reduce the chafing issue that happens in the warmer seasons.  DO NOT wear cotton!!!
    2. Hydration - Drink fluids before, during, and after your run.  If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated!  Plan your water breaks into your running route.  If you are running more than 30 minutes, include an electrolyte drink.  Avoid caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, they are dehydrating.
    3. Avoid running in the middle of the day - Run first thing in the morning or later in the day to avoid the heat and humidity of the day.  Find a shady road or trail to run on, stay in the shade!
    4. Sunscreen - Put it on….everyday, every time!!!!
    5. It’s ok to go slower in the heat - Give your body time to adjust to the heat and humidity.  If you feel dizzy, or if your skin feels clammy, stop and get out of the sun.
    6. Socks - Moisture wicking socks are a must!  NO cotton socks….makes my feet feel sweaty just thinking about it!
    7. Sunglasses - Great for keeping the sun and pesky bugs out of your eyes
    8. Running Hats - These are a great alternative for those who prefer not to wear sunglasses.  Not only does this protect the eyes from the sun, they also shield the face from the suns harmful rays.  Just remember to buy a running hat because it always breath-ability.

    The Dangers of Heat and Humidity

    When heat and humidity combine to reduce the amount of evaporation of sweat from the body, outdoor exercise becomes dangerous even for those in good shape. Key rules for coping with heat are to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration and to slow down and cool off when feeling fatigued, a headache, a high pulse rate or shallow breathing. Overheating can cause serious, even life-threatening conditions such as heat stroke. The apparent temperature, which combines the temperature and relative humidity, is a guide to the danger. Below is the heat stress index based on the apparent temperature.

    Read More
  • Tips for Runners

    General Safety Tips

    1. Don’t wear headphones. If you choose to wear them, don’t get lost in your music. Be aware of your surroundings.
    2. Carrying Identification. Write down your name, phone number and blood type on a runners shoe ID tag.
    3. Carry a cell phone.
    4. Trust your intuition about a person or an area. React on your intuition and avoid a person or situation if you are unsure. If something tells you a situation is not “right”, it isn’t.
    5. Always stay alert and aware of what’s going on around you. The more aware you are, the less vulnerable you are.
    6. Write down or leave word of the direction of your run. Tell friends and family of your route and when to expect you back.
    7. Run against traffic so you can observe approaching cars.
    8. Wear reflective material if you run before dawn or after dark. Blinking lights are a great option.
    9. Practice memorizing license tags or identifying characteristics of strangers.
    10. Look both ways before crossing. Be sure the driver of the car acknowledges your right of way before crossing in front of the vehicle.
    11. Call police immediately if something happens to you or someone else, or you notice anyone out of the ordinary. It is important to report incidents immediately.
    12. Avoid unpopulated areas, deserted streets and overgrown trails. Especially avoid unlit areas at night. Run clear of parked cars or bushes.

     

    Hot Weather Running Tips

    1. Clothing - Choose light-colored, loose fitting synthetic fabrics. This fabric wicks the moisture away from your skin so you have a more comfortable run. It also helps reduce the chafing issue that happens in the warmer seasons. DO NOT wear cotton!!!
    2. Hydration - Drink fluids before, during, and after your run. If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated! Plan your water breaks into your running route. If you are running more than 30 minutes, include an electrolyte drink. Avoid caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, they are dehydrating.
    3. Avoid running in the middle of the day - Run first thing in the morning or later in the day to avoid the heat and humidity of the day. Find a shady road or trail to run on, stay in the shade!
    4. Sunscreen - Put it on….everyday, every time!!!!
    5. It’s ok to go slower in the heat - Give your body time to adjust to the heat and humidity. If you feel dizzy, or if your skin feels clammy, stop and get out of the sun.
    6. Socks - Moisture wicking socks are a must! NO cotton socks….makes my feet feel sweaty just thinking about it!
    7. Sunglasses - Great for keeping the sun and pesky bugs out of your eyes
    8. Running Hats - These are a great alternative for those who prefer not to wear sunglasses. Not only does this protect the eyes from the sun, they also shield the face from the suns harmful rays. Just remember to buy a running hat because it always breath-ability.

     

    Winter Weather Running Tips

    1. Dress in layers - Choose a highly breathable base layer. This is what you should wear the closest to your skin. A wicking material will move the moisture away from your skin, making you feel more comfortable on your run. Wear a looser, second layer of breathable material. Fleece would be a good choice for this layer on a cold day. This adds insulation between your base layer and outer layer. The outer layer should be breathable, wind-resistant and water resistant material.
    2. Wear a hat - Your uncovered head is responsible for 40% of heat loss. Try wearing a head band if a hat feels too hot.
    3. Protect your hands - Mittens are warmer than gloves because the body heat from the other fingers warm each other.
    4. Wear warm socks - Socks made of synthetic fibers wick moisture away from your skin. Smartwool socks are a great option. Never wear cotton socks!
    5. Shoes - Yak Trax are a great investment for winter running. These are like snow tires for your shoes.
    6. Don’t forget the sunscreen - The sun is still strong, even in the winter.
    7. Wear reflective clothing - Buy clothing with the reflective material already on it. Extra reflective gear is always a good idea. The more visible you are, the safer you are. Vests, arm bands and blinking lights are great choices.
    8. Don't overdress - Dress like it is 20 degrees warmer than it really is. You will warm up after you get moving.
    Read More

133-139 of 139

Page:
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 8
  4. 9
  5. 10
  6. 11
  7. 12