To top
Hide Show Categories

Gazelle Sports

  • E2 Eating and Exercise for Optimal Fitness


    1.    Hydrate

    • Before, during, after exercise. 16 ounces, 2 hours prior; 8 ounces, 15 minutes prior; 7-10 ounces, every 15-20 minutes. Replenish based on sweat rate.
    • All day long – elite athletes will drink an average of 2 cups of fluid between and with meals, primarily water.
    • Water, 100% fruit juice, low fat diary products, sports drinks and recovery drinks.
    • Minimum 8 cups, although your specific needs are driven by age, weight, % body fat, training adaptation, weather and more.

    2.    Carbohydrate (CHO) Rich

    • 55-65% of calories
    • Fresh fruits & vegetables (50% of your plate), low fat dairy, grains (50% whole grain)
    • 25-38 grams of fiber per day
    • CHO are stored 2/3 in muscle, 1/3 in liver as glycogen that fuel exercise.
    • In the absence of CHO you will breakdown muscle (& fat) to fuel your runs.

    3.    Eat a Big Breakfast

    • Never start your engine cold
    • Replenish with 3:1 CHO : PRO ratio after morning workout

    4.    3 Meals, 2-3 Snacks

    • Meals – minimum of 3 food groups
    • Snacks – minimum of 2 food groups
    • Always fluid, smaller portion
    • 3 low fat diary, 2.5 cups of vegetables, 5 fruits, 5 grains, protein source at every
    • meal.

    5.    Balance

    • Most common missing nutrients: fluid, carbohydrate, calcium (low fat dairy, fortified OJ, shrimp, salmon, beans), iron (lean red meat, greens, beans, nuts, legumes, brown grains) potassium (OJ, low fat dairy, tomatoes, potatoes), Vitamin A (low fat dairy eggs, carrots, spinach, margarine & salad dressing), Vitamin C (bell peppers, broccoli, oranges, strawberries, cantaloupe), Folate (beans, asparagus, spinach).

    6.    Sleep

    • 7-8 hours minimum
    • Restless sleep is sign of overtraining, take day off

    7.    Train

    • Increases glycogen storage capability
    • Strengthens heart lung capability
    • Increases delivery of oxygen to muscle cells
    • Reduces potential for lactic acid build up

    8.    Weight Loss/Gain Timing

    • Not during final count down
    • Decrease with % increase in muscle, not increase in drag
    • Don’t be a yo yo.

    9.    Limit Sweets to 10% of Total Calories

    • No Good/Bad foods
    • Do Diets
    • As an athlete choose foods that fuel your activity so that you can train and compete at your optimal level.

    E2 Eating & Exercise for Optimal Fitness: How Can I Lose Drag, Gain Muscle?

    Many runners believe that a leaner physique will increase their speed. It’s a reasonable conclusion that a body comprised of a higher percentage of muscle will run faster if it has less body fat to tow. This rings true in most sports when comparing players whose positions require faster response times. For example, football lineman traditionally have more body fat than the linebackers, middle distance swimmers average greater than sprinter swimmers, and track and field distance disc and shot put are higher than distance runners. However some athlete’s pursuit of body fat level that is too low for their sport puts them at risk for increased frequency of illness, injury, slower times, increased recovery needs and potentially an eating disorder. If you are interested in losing weight as you train for this season’s summer and fall events, be wary of overly restricting calories. You must strike a very delicate balance when attempting to build muscle and lose fat simultaneously. A diet that is too limited in calories, results in the body breaking down muscle to use for fuel. A slow, gradual weight loss of 1⁄2 to 1 pound a week will minimize the muscle loss associated with fast and dramatic results. Minimize your muscle loss by consuming protein at each meal (beef, chicken, turkey, fish, nuts, legumes, eggs, low fat diary) and don’t skip meals. Instead you want to eat frequently to offer your muscles a constant supply of protein and fuel. In addition to your regular cardiovascular workout make sure you are strength training at least twice a week, all 3 major muscle groups (legs & buttocks, arms & shoulders, abdomen & back). Don’t worry about weight plateaus if you’re a scale watcher since muscle weighs more than fat.

    Hitting the Wall

    Muscle pain, overwhelming feeling of fatigue, lightheaded, irritable, and poor concentration are all signs of hitting the wall.
    Why we train is to store more fuel as glycogen, conserve glycogen, rely more on fat, improve heart and lung capacity and enhanced delivery of oxygen to muscle.

    End Note

    Train with what you will race with.

    Read More
  • Athlete Nutrition Overview


    Carbohydrates

    • Most efficient fuel for the body
    • Select slower acting forms for steady energy: whole grains, legumes, low fat milk/yogurt, whole fruit
    • Select simpler forms during activity - 30-60g/hour after the first hour

    Common Mistakes

    • 50-65% of our diet should be Carbohydrates, and at least half of them should eb from whole grains.
    • Carbohydrates should be consumed every 3-5 hours
    • Choose whole grain carbohydrates to avoid peaks or crashing in energy
    • Supplementing appropriately during a workout

     

    Protein

    • Essential for building and maintaining muscle-mass, injury prevention
    • Include at all meals and snacks if longer time between meals
    • Lean choices: lean ground beef and pork, poultry, seafood, nuts, eggs, low-fat dairy, beans, seeds

    Common mistakes:

    • Consumption of too much protein and not enough carbohydrate
    • Not consuming protein throughout the day to maintain energy
    • Believing you need more

     Fats

    • Transports/stores vitamins; maintains cell membranes; assists with metabolism; maintains healthy skin/hair
    • Poor source of fuel for workouts
    • Choose heart-healthy choices: nuts, seeds, oil, avocado, olives

    Common Mistakes

    • Not consuming enough fat
    • Consuming more saturated and trans fats rather than unsaturated fats

    Hydration

    • The best indicator is urine. Try to keep urine pale to clear in color through out the day
    • 16-24oz within 2 hours before o 6-12oz just before start
    • 6-12oz every 15-20 minutes during
    • Sports drink with 6-8% carbohydrate for events longer than 1 hour or high intensity/high heat

    Common Mistakes

    • Dehydration: throbbing headache; dizziness; severe fatigue; restlessness; confusion, nausea/vomiting
    • Weight loss of greater than 2% of body weight during exercise can cause dehydration that can compromise cardiac function, metabolic reactions, and thermo regulation
    • Electrolytes need to be replaced after the first hour of exercise, water is not enough to re-hydrate.

    Supplements

    • Try to get all of the vitamins and minerals from eating colorful, varied meals.
    • When looking for a multivitamin, try to find something that provides about 100% of the RDA
    • Caffeine: beneficial before workout for increasing endurance-spares glycogen and aids fat metabolism
    • Protein: consuming 20g protein post workout is optimal, more shows no benefit; this can come from a 20oz glass of milk
    • Glucosamine: beneficial to joints in those with issues; little risk
    • Fish Oil: a good idea if you do not consume omega-3 fatty acids in the diet
    • Fish Oil: a good idea if you do not consume omega-3 fatty acids in the diet

    Common Sports Nutrition Issues

    Hitting the Wall

     

    • Glycogen depletion due to limited carbohydrate intake - muscle glycogen storage infinite - max is approx. 80-120 minutes before depleted
    • Once glycogen depleted, you convert fat = increased 0xygen uptake = fatigue (hit the wall)
    • Every gram of glycogen is attached to 3g water - lack of either can impact doubly

    Dehydration

    • Stroke volume decreases due to decreased blood volume
    • To maintain cardiac output, heart rate increases = fatigue
    • Follow guidelines above - use sports drinks as appropriate

    Cramping

    • Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, hydration
    • Electrolyte supplementation

    Recovery Time

    • Carbohdyrates are essential to restock glycogen stores - intake should be at least 60-75g carbs
    • Aim for 4:1 carb/protein ratio within 1 hour after workout
      • Many commercial recovery products aim to do this (Accelerade, Endurox, etc)
      • Food examples: 1 1⁄2 cups Cheerios, 1 c. blueberries, 1 cup skim milk; 12 Triscuits and 1 oz cheese; 16oz chocolate milk; 1 cup Kashi Go Lean with lowfat yogurt; Power/Clif Bar with 8oz milk; 2 String cheese with 32oz Gatorade;
    • Waiting too long after workouts hinders recovery

    Cravings

    • Usually a result of poor meal timing, inadequate intake of foods
    Read More
  • Eat Your Way to Better Health

    What makes foods whole? Fruits, vegetables; whole grains, (such as brown rice, whole wheat, bulgur and quinoa; plus nuts, beans and lentils); wild salmon, olive oil, organic orgrass fed beef, organic, free-range chicken; milk and yogurt without additives produced
    from animals that have not been given hormones. While foods provide the vitamins,minerals, and antioxidants that your body needs to help fight disease and protect against aging. By eating whole/fresh foods instead of processed high-fat, high cholesterol foods and snacks, you get more fiber, complex carbohydrates, power
    nutrients, and good fats.

    Switching is easier than you think. Here are eight simple ways to shop smarter and eat healthier:

    1. Whenever possible, buy fresh/whole foods. Fill your fridge with the freshest produce; it’s loaded antioxidants. Frozen and can products without added ingredients/preservatives are also acceptable. Find farm-fresh eggs, fish and cheeses; and naturally raised chicken and meats without antibiotics, hormones,
      or animal by-products.
    2. Color your diet healthy. Instead of eating the same old fruits and vegetables everyday, expand your plate and your palette. Varieties that are red (cranberries), yellow (papayas), orange (peppers), and blue-purple (blueberries)are loaded with antioxidants. Leafy greens (such as kale and chard) and yellow-orange foods (butternut squash and carrots) contain vitamin A and calcium and
      are rich in carotenoids and other phytochemicals that boost the immune system, help prevent damage to cells, and protect against cancer and heart disease. Red and blue-purple foods (beets, grapes) contain anthocyanins (a type of flavonoid), which help prevent diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Try to eat nine servings of colorful fruits and vegetables a day. It’s not as intimidating as it sounds, one serving is just one-half cup.
    3. While shopping stick to the perimeter of the store. This is where you’ll find most whole foods: produce, dried fruit and nuts, fresh fish and meats, diary, and freshly baked whole-grain bread. The inner aisles are loaded with processed foods. Enter the danger zone only for such staples as heart-healthy extra-virgin olive oil, oats, other whole grains, and canned goods with no added salt/sugar; skip the snack aisle altogether. Although typically it’s best to buy fresh, there are still benefits to canned (i.e. Lycopene that is found in tomato products and other antioxidants that are found in fruit and vegetable juices) and frozen foods also as long as they do not have any added ingredients.
    4. Load up on whole grains. They contain the antioxidants and phytochemicals that are stripped out of white bread and pasta. Look for whole wheat breads with whole grains as their first ingredient and at least two grams of fiber per slice. Try
      whole wheat pasta, for extra vitamins, fiber and earthy flavor. In addition to brown and wild rice, try high-protein quinoa and cracked-wheat bulgur for pilafs. (However, most white pastas still have at least 2 grams of fiber preserving. So as long as you are sticking to the serving size pasta isn't all that bad!)
    5. Follow the thumbnail rule for packaged foods. Even organic or natural foods can sometimes contain lots of ingredients, an indication that they’re far from their whole food state. An easy test: Measure the ingredient list next to your thumbnail. If the list is longer than your nail (less than an inch) and contains anything you don’t recognize or can’t pronounce, take a pass. Remember the less ingredients, usually the better.
    6. Give breakfast a boost. Sprinkle ground flax seed (a great source of heart-protective alpha-linoleic acid) over oatmeal or whole-grain toast with peanut butter and honey. Keep frozen berries, bananas, and cherries in your freezer, blend with orange juice and yogurt for a smoothie.
    7. Snack smart. Switch from chips and pretzels to a homemade trail mix of salted, roasted almonds and pumpkin seeds (which contain healthy fats), and dried cranberries and raisins (which are loaded with concentrated antioxidants). Swap peanut butter crackers from the vending machine, which are full of trans fats for a natural peanut butter on apple slices.
    8. Make over your dinner. Stir-fry cherry tomato halves and minced garlic in extra virgin olive oil. Toss with whole wheat angel-hair pasta and a handful of arugula.Top with shavings of Parmesan cheese. Or make a colorful stir-fry with red bell pepper, eggplant, summer squash, and broccoli served over brown rice. Toss hot roasted sweet potatoes with red onion, baby spinach, a dash of balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. Enjoy!
    Read More
  • Power Foods

    Power Food What are the Benefits? When is this good to eat?
    Oatmeal Helps lower cholesterol, good
    source of fiber, and complex
    carbs that will sustain in a
    workout.
    Great pre-race food or any
    time that you wake up and
    feel hungry!
    Cottage Cheese It is packed with protein which
    runners need more for muscle
    repair and rebuilding.
    Anytime, except before your
    workout. This is also a great
    post-race snack.
    Pretzels Low-calorie snack, but
    provides you with a good carb
    boost, the salt helps you
    replace your sodium you lose
    when you sweat.
    These are a great afternoon
    snack and could be used as a
    post race snack.
    Hummus on Wheat Thins This snack is packed with
    protein, fiber, and vitamins. 
    This is a good mid morning or
    afternoon snack.
    Salmon High in Omega-3 fatty acids
    which help keep your immune
    systems protected; may aid in
    blood flow which could help
    your workout; also provides
    you with protein.
    This is great food for lunch
    and dinner. It’s great to put in
    salads or to combine with
    pastas.
    Blueberries These berries are loaded with
    antioxidants such as vitamin
    C that will help keep you
    healthy and provide you with
    essential vitamins.
    You can mix these with all
    sorts of things. They are
    great to eat morning, noon or
    night!
    Almonds Loaded with the antioxidant E
    they can help reduce muscle
    damage. They also give you
    a good dose of magnesium,
    potassium, and calcium.
    You can mix this with other
    nuts, throw them on a salad,
    or just eat them as a snack.
    Broccoli This green veggie has it all, it
    has vitamin C, which aids in
    muscle damage that is
    brought on by exercise and has a bunch of phytochemicals that helps
    fight diseases.
    You can snack on these
    anytime, steam them with
    your dinner, add them to a
    salad or soups.
    Read More
  • Food/Fuel Considerations for Training

    Nutrition is an important factor in becoming and being fit and in performing our best. It is
    important to have a plan that works for your body to prepare, perform and recover in training
    and racing.

    Before Workout
    For many people, it can be difficult to have anything in their stomach before running; however,
    eating prior to a longer run can be critically important when workouts go beyond one hour. We
    recommend eating one to two hours before a long run. For runs under one hour, runners do not
    necessarily need to eat but may feel better if they do – it is a personal choice.

    For most runners, eating a food with simply and complex carbohydrates like oatmeal or
    toast/jam provides an easy to digest and good start for a long run. Others may choose an
    energy bar or beverage that is formulated to provide an elevated, consistent energy level over
    an extended period of time. These typically include a balanced mix of simple and complex
    carbohydrates, some protein and fiber.

    It is good to get use to eating something prior to running by slowly introducing light foods or
    energy bars on longer training runs.

    During Workout
    During a workout or race, no matter what type, you need to quickly absorb carbohydrate-based
    calories to replace the glucose you are burning at 400 - 600 calories per hour or you will begin
    to lose concentration and energy.
    There are several alternatives to fuel the body during exercise.
    Food like fruits
    Sports Drinks
    Energy Gels/GU
    Energy Bars
    Energy Gelatins
    These are designed for easy digestion and absorption into your bloodstream. The goal is to
    provide sustained energy through a gradual rise (not a spike) in energy followed by a similarly
    gradual decline. Chews, gels and beverages are favorites due to their simplicity and agreeable
    taste.

    Also during exercise proper fluid intake is critical. Good hydration helps to prevent overheating
    and increases your blood flow, transporting vital nutrients and oxygen to your working muscles,
    which is the most important factor for a good workout. Yet during exercise water is not enough
    to keep your body properly hydrated. Your body needs electrolytes in the correct ratio to replace
    the sodium and potassium you are losing through sweat. At the same time, your body needs
    complex carbohydrates (not sugar) to maintain your blood glucose and muscle glycogen at
    levels necessary to have a great workout/race from start to finish.

    Again, some runners have some difficulty taking different types of fuel sources while running. It
    is important to experiment and find what works best for you.

    What is GU?
    GU is the most popular energy gel for endurance activities. GU is a convenient, carbohydrate
    gel formulated to energize before, sustain during, and aid in recovery after your training and
    competitions. Made with a unique blend of ingredients, GU provides: complex carbohydrates for
    sustained energy, amino acids to maintain muscle protein, antioxidants and muscle buffers to
    aid with recovery.

    Recovery Phase
    If rehydration was the only factor to enhancing performance, a conventional sports drink would
    be enough. But athletes don't just need to rehydrate, their muscles need to recover, too. Protein
    speeds muscle recovery. During prolonged exercise, up to 10% of the muscles' energy can
    come from metabolizing protein, which can come from the breakdown of muscle. Having protein
    in sports drink minimizes the breakdown of protein from the muscle during exercise. The result
    can be a quicker recovery.

    The ability of any athlete to perform at their best is directly related to how fast their muscles
    recover after exercise. Protein-enhanced recovery drinks give muscles a jump-start on getting
    back to peak performance. In fact, recovery drinks have been shown to significantly reduce
    muscle damage following exercise. Compared to a conventional sports drink, it minimizes
    muscle soreness. These are fortified with proteins, amino acids and other muscle-restoring
    elements to help hasten the repair and restoration of cells in your body.

    What do these products offer that traditional foods cannot?
    Easy portability. Bananas, as great as they are as energy boosters, quickly get beat up when
    transported in an adventurer's pack.
    Long shelf life. No refrigeration (or similar food-handling precautions) needed.
    Convenience. What you need (concentrated, specialized nutrients), when you need it (any time
    you choose) and where you need it (any place you choose).
    Which items are best suited for you? We suggest you experiment with various products.
    Stick with the ones that:

    • Deliver the best results for you
    • Feel most comfortable in your stomach
    • Offer the most appealing flavor and texture for your tastes.
    • Many products can serve more than one of these functions. But these general designations can help guide you to choices best suited to your needs.
    • How many of these items do you need? It depends on the intensity of your activity or workout. For a light training run, for example, you may not need any. A more moderate run may call for just a single item from one of these categories. The more demanding (and prolonged) your activity, the more options your body may likely need to sustain peak performance.

    Try different methods during your training so that you can be confident on race day!

    Please Note: This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional dietary advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding proper nutrition for your body.

    Read More
  • Top Ten Foods for Athletes

    By Kimberly J. Mueller; MS, RD, SDTC Sports Nutritionist Whether you are training for a marathon, getting dirty riding a muddy single track or surfing some beautiful waves, the food you feed your body will dictate how well you will perform. While supplements seem like an easy solution, research supports the notion that whole foods are still the best source of the nutrients you will need for optimal
    health and peak performance. Below I have listen the top ten foods for runners. Eat up!!!

    1. Go Red!!! Lycopene, a vitamin-like substance that makes tomatoes and watermelon red, has potent antioxidant qualities that help reduce some of the cellular damage that occurs to activate muscles during exercise. Lycopene has also been shown to reduce the risk for prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, and other cancers too (particular breast and cervical cancer). The highest does and best absorbed form of lycopene is found in processed tomato products, such as tomato sauce or tomato soup. So the eating of spaghetti and pizza should be encouraged in the name of good health. Extra sauce please!
    2. Get into the Swim of Seafood!!! Seafood is high in protein and zinc. Zinc is important for immune function and also helps clear carbon dioxide out of our muscles to help enhance recovery from intense exercise. Cold-water fish, including salmon, herring, mackerel, and sardines are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids which are effective in lowering risk for heart disease and may help boost fat burning. Most health professionals recommend at least 2-3 fish meals each to reap the benefits of seafood! If you don’t like seafood, omega-3 fatty acids can also be found in canola, flax seed and soybean oils, as well as walnuts.
    3. Bring on the Broccoli!!! Is a nagging cold compromising your performance? Rich in vitamin C, broccoli may help boost your immune system, helping to prevent unwanted illness during training. Broccoli is also an excellent source of calcium and potassium, which help to maintain strong bones and contribute to healthy connective tissue and cartilage. Put chopped broccoli on pizza, in spaghetti sauces, in stir fries, and in salads to help maintain peak immune function during season.
    4. Energize with Asparagus!!! Asparagus is low in calories, contains no cholesterol or fat, and is an excellent source of thiamin, which aids in the conversion of glucose into energy and also helps synthesize and breakdown amino acids. Add a healthy ration of asparagus spears to your meal or snack as means to help boost performance.
    5. Soybeans (edamame)!!! Rich in complex carbohydrates and protein, soybeans have been touted as the perfect recovery food. Soy is the only complete plant source of protein, containing all the amino acids necessary for repairing and building muscle. In addition, soy contains disease-fighting phytochemicals and appetite-surpressing unsaturated fats. Soy can also be implemented in the diet in the form of tofu, textured soy protein, tempeh, soy milk, soy flour, soy nut butter and soy nuts.
    6. Sow your Oats!!! Starting your day off with a bowl of oatmeal will help sustain your energy levels as well as maximize your glycogen stores for peak endurance performance. Oatmeal is also an excellent source of B-vitamins (for stress and energy production) and contains a significant amount of zinc for immune function. My favorite oatmeal concoction is as follows: Mix ½ cup old fashioned oats with ¼ cut natural granola. Add 1 handful of favorite fruit and 1 handful of almond or walnuts. Pour over 1 cup of nonfat milk and cook mixture in microwave for 2-3 minutes.
    7. Bone Up on Calcium!!! As a good source of both calcium and vitamin D, milk is most commonly marketed as a bone builder. Milk is also an excellent source of low-glycemic carbohydrates and is a complete protein source making it a great pre- or post-workout snack option. In addition, calcium is crucial for proper muscle function; cramping may incur with a deficiency. Blend low-fat milk with yogurt and fruit for a delicious, nutrient-rich smoothie.
    8. Boost Endurance with Raw Honey!!! A recent study performed at the University of Memphis Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory showed that the blend of sugars found in raw honey can significantly increase an athlete’s average power and endurance. In its natural state, raw honey is an immediate source of energy, full of B-complex vitamins, amino acids, and enzymes. Add honey to toast, cereal, tea for added sweetness and a quick boost of energy.
    9. Go Nuts!!! Eaten raw, nuts are a great source of vitamin E. Adequate vitamin E helps with heart health and also helps reduce some of that damage that occurs to our muscles during exercise. Nuts are also filling and satisfying because of their healthy monounsaturated fat content. Try a little raw nut butter on a piece of whole wheat bread with a half of banana sliced up on top. It’s delicious!
    10. The Bold and the Blue. A 1/2 cup and a mere 40 calories later, you get a hefty 2.5 grams of fiber as well as a significant amount of vitamin C, which is a potent antioxidant that keeps our immune system running at its peak. Blueberries have the highest ORAC score (oxygen radical absorbency capacity) of any fresh fruit, which means they can destroy free radicals in the body before they cause damage to our healthy cells. In addition, the dye that makes blueberries "blue" have been shown to improve memory, balance and coordination. So the next time you are at the store, be bold and buy blue. Blueberries are a tasty addition to cereals, salads and smoothies.
    Read More
  • 100 Calorie Snacks

    Cherries: 1 Cup

    100% Fruit Juice: 6 oz

    Raw Vegetables: 3 cups of almost all types of vegetables

    Salad: 1 ¼ pound bag (pre-cut)

    Apple: 1 Medium Size 3 inches

    Strawberries: 2 Whole Cups Sliced up

    Orange: 1 Large

    Blueberries: 1 ¼ Cup

    Grapefruit: 2 Large Grapefruits Plain

    Watermelon: 1 ½ Wedges

    Low-fat Milk: 1 cup (8oz) low fat is 1%, ½ % and skim

    Banana: Medium Size

    Yogurt: 4 oz

    Reduced Fat Triscuits: 6

    Reduced Fat Wheat Thins: 13

    Graham Crackers: 2 Sheets

    Saltines: 6

    Air-popped Popcorn: 3 Cups

    Pretzels: 12 to 15 individual

    Cheerios/Kix/Rice Krispies/Special K: 1 Cup

    Raisin Bran/Shredded Wheat/Bran Flakes: ½ Cup

    Oatmeal (plain): ½ Cup or 1 Packet

    Peanuts Dry Roasted: 19 Individual nuts

    Trail Mix (nut/raisin/chocolate mix): 2 ½ tablespoons

    Hershey Kisses: 3 individual kisses

    Jell-O Fat Free Pudding Cups: 1 Cup

    Almonds: 10 individual almonds

    Jelly Beans Sugar Free: 45 individual pieces

    Gummy Bears: 12 individual pieces

    Chocolate Chip Cookies: 2 Medium Sized

    Read More
  • Eating for the Long Run

    It comes as no surprise that providing your body with the proper nutrition while training for a marathon will help optimize your running performance. We know that good nutrition will help your body to “run” more efficient, enhance your overall health and immune system, aid in preventing/healing injuries, improve your body’s adaptation to training as well as promote speedy recovery. The food you eat and the way you eat it will indeed dictate how well you run! But with so much information out there it can be hard to know what to do and when to do it! Below are some basic recommendations to help you fuel your body for peak running performance. Use this information to guide you, but don’t be ultra concerned about all the details so much that you don’t enjoy eating!!!!! After all we run to eat! Or do we eat to run? Remember what might work for one person, may not work for you. Try to remember that just like running should be fun, eating should be fun too! Practice, practice, practice during your long runs to see what does and doesn't work for you and than follow that on race day!

    BASIC GUIDELINES: Endurance runners should aim for a diet high in carbohydrates (60-70%), moderate in protein (12-20%) and low in fat (20-25%). Food choices should include foods from all the 5 food groups: Grains, Vegetables, Fruits, Milk/dairy and Meat/Beans. Calories should be spread evenly throughout the day (no skipping meals, especially breakfast which is the MOST important meal of the day), eating 3-6 times per day. Women should aim for 2,000 to 3,500 calories/day, men should aim for 2,500-4,000 calories per day. On rest days and shorter run days, aim for the lower end of the calories; on long run days shoot for the upper range.

    CARBOHYDRATE: is truly a runner’s best friend because it serves as the primary energy source for working muscles and helps the body to use fat more efficiently. Carbs also help to maintain optimal blood sugars levels. Carbs are stored in the muscles as glycogen, which is the primary fuel you need to keep MOVING. When glycogen stores start to diminish, so do you. This is when exercise intensity reduces and you start to feel pain, cramping and sluggishness known as “The WALL” take place. This will usually happen after about 90 minutes to 2 hours of running. Going out too fast too soon will also contribute to the deletion of glycogen stores. Therefore, training you body with running as well as carb intake will help avoid hitting the wall. Carbohydrate is also the source of many photochemicals and antioxidants which help us repair, recover, maintain a healthy immune system and prevent/heal an injury. Therefore a diet high in carbs is essential for long distance running performance. Examples of good sources to fuel your body are: pasta, rice, potatoes, cereal, fruit, vegetables, some low fat/fat free dairy products and whole grain product. Remember that 60-70% of your diet should be coming from these carbohydrate sources. One of the rewards of running is being able to sneak in a few sweets/treats now and then. But make sure you avoid “living” off from junk food as your main carb source because these carbs are virtually nutrient free and could end up harming your training efforts. To help figure out the amount that’s right for you, multiply your weight in pounds by 3.2 to give you the number of grams of carbohydrates you should consume per day.

    Examples include:

    • 15 grams of carb=1/2 cup cooked rice or pasta & 1 serving of fruit, 1⁄2 cup of starchy vegetables or 1⁄2 cup dried beans.
    • 12 grams of carb= 1 cup of low fat milk or yogurt or 1.5 oz of cheese
    • 5 grams of carb= 1 cup leafy raw vegetables or 1⁄2 cup chopped vegetables

    PROTEIN: is used to build and repair body tissues including muscles, tendons and ligaments. Protein is NOT a primary source of energy for long distance runners. Your body can only use so much at one time, any excess may be converted to fat. 12-20% of your diet should come from protein. To figure out the amount for you, multiply your weight in pounds by .6 to calculate the number of grams of protein you should consume per day.   

    Examples include:

    • 21 grams of protein: 3 oz lean meat, poultry or fish provides
    • 8 grams of protein: One cup of low fat milk or yogurt provides
    • 7 grams of protein: 1⁄2 cup cooked beans, 1 ounce of cheese, 1 egg, 4 oz of tofu or 2 T peanut butter
    • 3 grams of protein: A serving of whole grain product (i.e. 1⁄2 cup cereal, 1 slice of bread)

    FAT: helps a runner sustain prolonged exercise. It is also an energy source that insulates the body against cold as well as helps protect and cushion vital organs. Limit fat for pre run/pre race meals as it exits the stomach slowly and my cause cramping. Fat burns better when combined with carbohydrates. There are three kinds of fat. Saturated fats include: butter, hydrogenated oils, coconut oil and palm oil. Polyunsaturated fats include: corn oil, soybean oil and margarine. Monounsaturated fats include: olive oil, canola oil and peanut oil and are the preferred fat. Peanuts butter (natural) is a good source of monounsaturated fat. Approximately 20-25% of your diet should come from fat, 10% coming from saturated fat.

    FLUIDS: Marathon runners are at risk for dehydration, and hyponatrimia (low blood sodium levels, a dangerous but easily preventable condition). Dehydration can bring on fatigue, cramps and impair performance. If you drink too much and aren't properly replacing your electrolytes you lose in sweat you are at risk for hyponatremia (low sodium levels) which can produce symptoms such a nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness, headache, disorientation and bloating in face and hands. In general water is sufficient for any runs under one hour.    Any runs 60-90 minutes or longer generally require more than water (i.e. Gatorade, Ultima, Endurox R4). To figure out your basic fluid needs take 1⁄2 your body weight (lbs) in fluid ounces. (140 # person would require 70 oz/day)

    BASIC GUIDELINES BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER RUNNING:

    Before: A meal or snack should provide sufficient fluid to maintain hydration, be fairly low in fat and fiber to aid in bowel elimination and minimize any GI distress, be relatively high in carbohydrate to help maintain blood glucose, be moderate in protein. Choose foods that are familiar and well tolerated, avoid unfamiliar foods. Drink 14-22 oz of fluid 2-3 hours before a long run and another 7-10 oz 10-20 minutes before the run.

     

    Pre Race Snacks:

    • 1 small bagel +2 tbsp peanut butter + 1 small banana.
    • 4 oz juice, 8 oz yogurt, 2 slices toast.
    • 1 1⁄2 cup ready to eat cereal or 1 cup oatmeal + 1⁄2 cup skim milk + 1 fruit.
    • 1 fruit cereal bar + 4 oz juice

    During: The primary goals for nutrient consumption are to replace fluid losses and provide carbohydrate (approximately 30-60 grams per hour) for the maintenance of blood glucose levels and to keep muscles primed. 6-12 oz of fluid should be consumed every 15-20 minutes depending on tolerance. Race snacks: gels, cliff shots, bananas, oranges, Fig Newton’s, graham crackers, pretzels, Jelly beans or fruit chews, granola bars, rice crispy squares, raisins.

    After: The dietary goal is to provide adequate energy and carbohydrates to replace muscle glycogen and to ensure rapid recovery. Carbohydrate intake of 1.5 grams/kg body weight during the first 30 minutes (approximately) 60-100 grams carb) will be adequate to replace glycogen stores. Protein consumed after exercise will provide amino acids for the building and repair of muscle tissue. Runners should consume a mixed meal providing carbs, protein and fat soon after a long run/marathon. Drink enough fluids to replace sweat losses during exercise. Drink at least 16-24 ounces of fluid for every pound of body weight lost during exercise.

     

    Recovery Snacks:

    • Fruit smoothie: 1 cup skim milk, 1 small banana, 1 cup frozen berries.
    • 1 cup cottage cheese w/fruit and 1 cup grapes and 1 cup orange juice.
    • 1 cup low fat chocolate milk, gram crackers and peanut butter.
    • Baked potato with low fat cheese.
    • Pasta with low fat meat/cheese.

    Good eating habits are a lot like good training habits. Remember the big picture: don’t get caught up in the day to day things. A treat in your diet from time to time won’t harm your performance just like taking a break from your training schedule once in a while. In the long “run”, relax, have fun, be consistent, learn what works for you and above all, have fun running and ENJOY YOUR FOOD!

    Sources: Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance, Gatorade Sports Science Institute, National Athletic Trainers Association, USDA My pyramid, Cool Running, Runners world, and American College of Sports Medicine.

    Read More
  • Fluid Replacement

    Type of Event Timing of Consumption Amount & Type of Beverage

    Sports or exercise
    less than 1 hour in duration
    Before: 24 hours Drink adequate fluids
    2 hours 16 oz. (2 cups) cold water
    5-10 minutes 8-6 oz. (1-2 cups) cold water
    During: Every 15-20 minutes 8-10 oz. (1-1 1/4 cups) cold water
    Recovery: Over next 24 hours Adequate fluid to replace losses

    Sports or exercise
    from 1-4 hours in
    duration
    Before: 24 hours Drink adequate fluids
    2 hours 16 oz. (2 cups) glucose electrolyte
    solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    5-10 minutes 8-6 oz.(1-2 cups) glucose electrolyte
    solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    During: Every 15-20 minutes 8-10 oz. (1-1 1/4 cups) glucose electrolyte solution (4-8%) carbohydrate
    Recovery: Immediately after
    exercise & every 2 hours for 6-8
    hours following exercise
    Glucose electrolyte solution or glucose
    polymer solution to provide 1gram
    carb/kg body wt.
    Read More
  • Cold Weather Running Tips

    Winter Weather Running Tips

    1. Dress in layers - Choose a highly breathable base layer.  This is what you should wear the closest to your skin.  A wicking material will move the moisture away from your skin, making you feel more comfortable on your run. Wear a looser, second layer of breathable material. Fleece would be a good choice for this layer on a cold day. This adds insulation between your base layer and outer layer. The outer layer should be breathable, wind-resistant and water resistant material.
    2. Wear a hat - Your uncovered head is responsible for 40% of heat loss. Try wearing a head band if a hat feels too hot.
    3. Protect your hands - Mittens are warmer than gloves because the body heat from the other fingers warm each other.
    4. Wear warm socks - Socks made of synthetic fibers wick moisture away from your skin.  Smartwool socks are a great option. Never wear cotton socks!
    5. Shoes - YakTrax are a great investment for winter running.  These are like snow tires for your shoes.
    6. Don’t forget the sunscreen - The sun is still strong, even in the winter.
    7. Wear reflective clothing - Buy clothing with the reflective material already on it.  Extra reflective gear is always a good idea. The more visible you are, the safer you are.  Vests, arm bands and blinking lights are great choices.
    8. Don't overdress - Dress like it is 20 degrees warmer than it really is.  You will warm up after you get moving.

    Winter Gear Ideas

    1. Base layer (moisure-moving to add comfort and warmth)
    2. Thermal layer (add warmth - weight of thermal layer depends on warmth of runner)
    3. Jacket or vest (windproof, water resistant)
    4. Reflective gear or blinking lights (visibility and safety)
    5. Compression tights (try CWX Compression Insulator or Saucony Amp Pro)
    6. Warm tights or pants (consider fleece lined or polyester)
    7. Windproof underwear
    8. Arm warmers
    9. Head gear (hat, headband, headlamp)
    10. Neck gator or Buff (multifunctional- warmth and breathing ease in coldest temps)
    11. Mittens or Gloves (some are reflective)
    12. Moisture-moving socks (wool, polyester)
    13. Compression socks or leg sleeves (great for running and recovery)
    14. YakTrax or StabilIcers
    15. Body Glide or Sport Wax (prevent chaffing/chapping)
    16. Hydration belt
    17. The Stick
    18. Runners Shoe ID Tag
    Read More
  • Hot Weather Running Tips

    1. Clothing - Choose light-colored, loose fitting synthetic fabrics.  This fabric wicks the moisture away from your skin so you have a more comfortable run.  It also helps reduce the chafing issue that happens in the warmer seasons.  DO NOT wear cotton!!!
    2. Hydration - Drink fluids before, during, and after your run.  If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated!  Plan your water breaks into your running route.  If you are running more than 30 minutes, include an electrolyte drink.  Avoid caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, they are dehydrating.
    3. Avoid running in the middle of the day - Run first thing in the morning or later in the day to avoid the heat and humidity of the day.  Find a shady road or trail to run on, stay in the shade!
    4. Sunscreen - Put it on….everyday, every time!!!!
    5. It’s ok to go slower in the heat - Give your body time to adjust to the heat and humidity.  If you feel dizzy, or if your skin feels clammy, stop and get out of the sun.
    6. Socks - Moisture wicking socks are a must!  NO cotton socks….makes my feet feel sweaty just thinking about it!
    7. Sunglasses - Great for keeping the sun and pesky bugs out of your eyes
    8. Running Hats - These are a great alternative for those who prefer not to wear sunglasses.  Not only does this protect the eyes from the sun, they also shield the face from the suns harmful rays.  Just remember to buy a running hat because it always breath-ability.

    The Dangers of Heat and Humidity

    When heat and humidity combine to reduce the amount of evaporation of sweat from the body, outdoor exercise becomes dangerous even for those in good shape. Key rules for coping with heat are to drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration and to slow down and cool off when feeling fatigued, a headache, a high pulse rate or shallow breathing. Overheating can cause serious, even life-threatening conditions such as heat stroke. The apparent temperature, which combines the temperature and relative humidity, is a guide to the danger. Below is the heat stress index based on the apparent temperature.

    Read More
  • Tips for Runners

    General Safety Tips

    1. Don’t wear headphones. If you choose to wear them, don’t get lost in your music. Be aware of your surroundings.
    2. Carrying Identification. Write down your name, phone number and blood type on a runners shoe ID tag.
    3. Carry a cell phone.
    4. Trust your intuition about a person or an area. React on your intuition and avoid a person or situation if you are unsure. If something tells you a situation is not “right”, it isn’t.
    5. Always stay alert and aware of what’s going on around you. The more aware you are, the less vulnerable you are.
    6. Write down or leave word of the direction of your run. Tell friends and family of your route and when to expect you back.
    7. Run against traffic so you can observe approaching cars.
    8. Wear reflective material if you run before dawn or after dark. Blinking lights are a great option.
    9. Practice memorizing license tags or identifying characteristics of strangers.
    10. Look both ways before crossing. Be sure the driver of the car acknowledges your right of way before crossing in front of the vehicle.
    11. Call police immediately if something happens to you or someone else, or you notice anyone out of the ordinary. It is important to report incidents immediately.
    12. Avoid unpopulated areas, deserted streets and overgrown trails. Especially avoid unlit areas at night. Run clear of parked cars or bushes.

     

    Hot Weather Running Tips

    1. Clothing - Choose light-colored, loose fitting synthetic fabrics. This fabric wicks the moisture away from your skin so you have a more comfortable run. It also helps reduce the chafing issue that happens in the warmer seasons. DO NOT wear cotton!!!
    2. Hydration - Drink fluids before, during, and after your run. If you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated! Plan your water breaks into your running route. If you are running more than 30 minutes, include an electrolyte drink. Avoid caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, they are dehydrating.
    3. Avoid running in the middle of the day - Run first thing in the morning or later in the day to avoid the heat and humidity of the day. Find a shady road or trail to run on, stay in the shade!
    4. Sunscreen - Put it on….everyday, every time!!!!
    5. It’s ok to go slower in the heat - Give your body time to adjust to the heat and humidity. If you feel dizzy, or if your skin feels clammy, stop and get out of the sun.
    6. Socks - Moisture wicking socks are a must! NO cotton socks….makes my feet feel sweaty just thinking about it!
    7. Sunglasses - Great for keeping the sun and pesky bugs out of your eyes
    8. Running Hats - These are a great alternative for those who prefer not to wear sunglasses. Not only does this protect the eyes from the sun, they also shield the face from the suns harmful rays. Just remember to buy a running hat because it always breath-ability.

     

    Winter Weather Running Tips

    1. Dress in layers - Choose a highly breathable base layer. This is what you should wear the closest to your skin. A wicking material will move the moisture away from your skin, making you feel more comfortable on your run. Wear a looser, second layer of breathable material. Fleece would be a good choice for this layer on a cold day. This adds insulation between your base layer and outer layer. The outer layer should be breathable, wind-resistant and water resistant material.
    2. Wear a hat - Your uncovered head is responsible for 40% of heat loss. Try wearing a head band if a hat feels too hot.
    3. Protect your hands - Mittens are warmer than gloves because the body heat from the other fingers warm each other.
    4. Wear warm socks - Socks made of synthetic fibers wick moisture away from your skin. Smartwool socks are a great option. Never wear cotton socks!
    5. Shoes - Yak Trax are a great investment for winter running. These are like snow tires for your shoes.
    6. Don’t forget the sunscreen - The sun is still strong, even in the winter.
    7. Wear reflective clothing - Buy clothing with the reflective material already on it. Extra reflective gear is always a good idea. The more visible you are, the safer you are. Vests, arm bands and blinking lights are great choices.
    8. Don't overdress - Dress like it is 20 degrees warmer than it really is. You will warm up after you get moving.
    Read More

145-156 of 156

Page:
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 9
  4. 10
  5. 11
  6. 12
  7. 13