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Tag Archives: Flexibility

  • Stretching Program

    This packet is designed for education to prevent injury and to promote health. If you experience an injury you should consult with your physician for proper care and treatment. The physicians and physical therapists at K-Valley Orthopedics specialize in sports medicine injuries and understand your desire to maintain an active, healthy lifestyle. Call 269-343-8170 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

     

    Guidelines for Stretching: The key to stretching is consistency over the long haul. You will get more benefit from doing a few minutes each day, rather than spending half an hour one to two days a week. When you stretch you should keep the muscles relaxed and only pull to where you feel a gentle stretch. Do NOT strain. If you pull to hard the muscles will automatically tighten to protect against a muscle tear and you will not improve your muscle length. Do not bounce and remember to relax and breathe easily while stretching.

    Hold each stretch for 30 seconds and repeat twice. Do 1-2 x a day.

    ITB: This is a large tendon which starts at the top of your hip and pelvis and runs down along the outside of your leg and inserts along the side of your knee and shin. Use a rope or dog leash to assist this stretch. Lie on your back and place a loop around the involved foot. With your knee straight, first raise the leg straight up until you have reached waist height and then pull your leg across your body. Keep your back and shoulders flat on the floor the entire time.

    Hip Flexors: These muscles start from the lower spine and the top of the pelvis and insert onto the thigh and knee. Start in a half-kneeling position, with the leg you are stretching behind you. Keep your back straight and lean your hips forward until you feel a gentle stretch across the front or your hip. Do NOT overstretch.

    Quadriceps: This is a group of muscles along the front of the thigh. Stand with your back straight, pull your heel toward your buttock until a gentle stretch is felt across the front of your thigh. If you do not feel a stretch, tighten your butt muscles to increase the pull on the front of your thigh.

    Piriformis: This is a small muscle which runs from your sacrum to your hip. Laying on your back, with one hand pull your knee up toward your opposite shoulder and with the other hand pull your ankle toward your opposite shoulder until a gentle stretch is felt along your hip and buttock region.

    Adductor Stretch: This is the large group of muscles along the groin or inner thigh area. Sit with your legs yoga style but with the bottoms of your feet together rather than crossed, push out on your knees until a gentle stretch is felt along the back of your thigh. Standing with your heel up on a stool, keep your back straight, push your butt back, straighten your knee and pull your toes up until you feel a gentle stretch along the back of your leg.

    Gastrocnemius: This is the large muscle along the back of your calf. Position your back leg with knee straight, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Position your front leg with knee bent, foot flat, toes pointed straight ahead. Lean forward until you feel a gentle pull in the calf muscles of the back leg.

    Soleus: This is a smaller muscle of the calf that lies under the gastrocnemius. Position your back leg with knee slightly bent, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Position your front leg with knee bent, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Lean forward until a gentle stretch is felt in the muscles of your calf on the back leg.

    Hamstrings: This is a large muscle group along the back of the thigh. Place heel on a chair with your toes pulled up towards you, knee straight and push your hips and butt, backwards. Keep your back up straight, DO NOT bend over at the back.

    IT Band: This is a large strap like muscle and tendon that runs from the hip to the knee. Cross right leg over left, stick left hip out to the side, bring left arm up over the top of your head. Repeat the same to the other side.

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  • Dynamic Flexibility & Mobility

    Dynamic movements are the best way to prepare your body for dynamic workouts.  Contrary to old beliefs, the best time to work on static flexibility is at the end of your workout, and not in the beginning.  After every workout you should follow a 4-6 minute total body static stretching series.The following dynamic stretches will help develop you flexibility, balance, coordination, mobility and strength.

    Walking High Knees

     

    Purpose:  to flex the hips and shoulders, and stretch the glutes, quads, lower back and shoulders.

    Procedure:

    1. Take an exaggerate high step, driving your knee as high as possible and simultaneously push up on the toes of your opposite foot.
    2. Use the proper arm swing; 90° angle at the elbows, hands sing up to chin level and back beyond rear pocket.

    Key Points: Drive your knees up as high as possible.

    Variation - High knees pull: Same as above, but grab your knee and pull it up and in with each stride.

    Arm Swings

     

    Purpose: to relax and loosen the arms, upper and lower back.

    Procedure:

    1. Stand tall, feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart, with knees slightly bent.
    2. Hold arms out to the side.
    3. Slowly swing arms back and forth across the front of your body.
    4. Repeat this continuous motion for a minimum of 30 seconds.

    Key Points:
    Keep back straight at all times.

    Variation:  Overhead/down and back – swing both arms continuously to an overhead position and then forward, down and backwards.

    Side Bends

    Purpose: Wakes up the breathing muscles in the front and side of the chest and releases tension in the shoulders.

    Procedure:

    1. Stand tall with good posture, feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart, knees slight bent with hands resting on hips.
    2. Lift your trunk up and away from your hips and bend smoothly first to one side, then the other, avoiding the tendency to lean either forwards or backwards.
    3. Repeat the whole sequence sixteen times with a slow rhythm, breathing out as you bend to the side, and in as you return to the center.

    Key Points:
    Always try to avoid leaning forwards or backwards, stay centered.
    Variation: Place a toning bar on your shoulders and do same motion as above.

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  • How to Use The Stick

    The Stick is a revolutionary device used to segmentally compress and stretch muscle. It is highly effective in the treatment of muscle pain and trigger points.

    The Stick provides the following benefits:
     

    • Prevent & Predict Muscle Injuries
    • Dramatically improve strength, flexibility and endurance
    • Rapidly prepare muscles for physical activity
    • Disperse the effects of lactic acid following activity
    • Accelerate muscle recovery
    General Tips for Use

    • Keep muscles relaxed during rollout
    • Use on skin or through light clothing.
    • The Stick is waterproof and designed to bend without fear of breaking.
    • It is not necessary to hurt the muscle in order to help the muscle.
    • Most effective when used before, during and after periods of activity.
    • For pin-point rollout, slide hands onto spindles.
    • Excessive use may caue muscle soreness.

    General Instructions

    • A typical warm-up for healthy muscle tissue is about 20 progressively deeper passes over each muscle group (about 30 seconds per area).
    • Discomfort or pain is experienced when the spindles locate a bump or tender knot in the muscle - this is known as a trigger point.
    • Muscles containing trigger points are often weak, stiff and sore. They are frequently tight, easily tire and often hurt.
    • Muscles containing chronic trigger points need 20 additional passes over the involved area, and may require attention several times daily.
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