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Tag Archives: Personal Best

  • Long Distance Race Checklist

    Marathon/Half Marathon Checklist

    1. Get your packet early at EXPO – have time to look around – it’s fun
    2. Make sure you have YOUR CONFIRMATION
    3. Have your number pinned on your shirt the night before – it must be in front
    4. If you want crowd support – iron on your name or something to your shirt – people will yell what is printed to cheer you on!
    5. Tie the chip in to your shoe the night before
    6. Have an alarm or wake up call (not that you won’t wake up several times during the night)
    7. Remember to Body Glide the areas needed before you put on shoes, shirt, shorts
    8. Remember nothing new to wear today
    9. Double tie your shoes
    10. EAT breakfast
    11. Hydrate – hydrate – hydrate. Take at least one bottle of water with you to start
    12. Take an OLD SHIRT to put on for prerace warmth that you are willing to throw aside somewhere as the race begins or in the first mile or so (there are organizations who will pick up these shirts and give to shelter)
    13. Have a pair of cheap gloves (found at Meijer or a hardware store) or socks for your hands that you can throw aside
    14. If drizzling or raining take a garbage bag and wear it over your body until the start – there may be one in the race package
    15. Have a BATHROOM strategy for prerace – I suggest a trip to the porta-potty early for any bowel movement and use an empty water/Gatorade bottle (wide mouth) for while your standing in the huge line up to start – just squat and go
    16. Have a meeting place decided for afterwards – it is hard to find your family or friends if you don’t – there is a runner reunite area that has letters that you can use to meet someone
    17. Bring for afterwards: sandals (you’ll be glad to get out of your running shoes!), extra shirt (probably long sleeve), Ibuprofen, stretch or sweat pants, towel or towelette, and any personal special food/drink you like (there’s plenty at the event but some people have picky stomachs and may want that special item). Check in your bag if you do not have someone to carry it.

     

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  • Predicting Your Goal Race Pace

    If you have run a marathon or half marathon recently, you will have a rough idea of what your goal pace should be for that distance. For many Run Camp participants, however, the upcoming event will be the very first half or full marathon. Others may not have run the distance for an extended period of time and fitness levels may have changed. So how do you select your goal pace? Your training run and lactate threshold pace can give you a general indication, but a recently completed race of another distance can often be a great predictor of what your goal pace should be. Races used for prediction purposes should be run at a best effort. Also, races closer in distance to the goal race are a more accurate predictor than a much longer or shorter race. For example, the half marathon is a much better indicator of marathon time than a 5k is.

    For the half marathon, a recent 5k, 10k, 10 mile or even marathon time can give you an excellent indication of what your half marathon finishing time or goal pace should be. You can use the following conversion factors to determine the corresponding half marathon time and then use a pacing chart to determine the appropriate pace.

    5k                4.69
    10k              2.24
    10 mile        1.33
    Marathon    .472 For example, if your 10k time is 50 minutes (3000 seconds), your predicted half marathon time would be 6720 seconds (3000 x 2.24) or 1:52 or about an 8:30 min/mile pace. Likewise, if you ran the Crim in 1:30, your corresponding half marathon time would be 7182 seconds (5400 x 1.33) or 1:59 or about a 9:02 mile pace. Recently ran a marathon? A 3:30 marathon, 12,600 seconds, would correspond to 5947 seconds for a half marathon (12,600 x .472) or a 1:39 or about a 7:30 pace. For the marathon, a recent 10k, 10 mile or half marathon can provide a good indication of what your marathon finishing time and goal pace should be. Again, you would use the conversion factors below, than refer to a pacing chart to determine the appropriate pace for the predicted time.

    10k                     4.76
    10 mile               2.82
    Half Marathon    2.12

    For example, with a recent 10k time of 50 minutes (3000 seconds), your predicted marathon time would be 14,280 seconds (3000 x 4.76) or a 3:58 marathon. If you look at corresponding pacing charts, this would be about a 9:02 min/mile pace. If you recently ran a half marathon at 1:40 (6000 seconds), your corresponding marathon time would be approximately 12,720 seconds (6000 x 2.12) or 3:32, which corresponds to about an 8:02 pace. Keep in mind there can be many other factors that can impact your performance. Race time conversions, particularly from a much shorter distance, can be a bit aggressive for the first time marathoner. Training specificity, weather conditions, hydration and fueling are just some of the factors that can heavily impact performances. For example, you can have two people who ran a 40:00 min 10k. One may completed two 20-milers while the other wasn’t able to complete anything over 13 miles. The runner who trained specifically for the marathon will be more likely to run the predicted time, than one who has focused their training specifically on shorter distances.

    Reference: Pfitzinger, P., and S. Douglas. 1999. Road Racing for Serious Runners. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

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