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Tag Archives: Strength

  • 15 Minute Abs

    Superman

    What it Hits: transcerses abdominis (deep abs) and erector spinae (lower back)

    Start facedown on the floor, with your arms and legs extended out front. Raise your head, your left arm, and right leg about five inches off the floor. Hold for three counts, then lower. Repeat with your right arm and left leg. Do up to 10 reps on each side.

    Hints: Don’t raise your shoulders too much.
    Make it Harder: Lift both arms and legs at the same time.


    Bridge

    What it Hits: Glutes and hamstrings

    Lie faceup on the floor, with your knees bent 90 degrees, your feet on the floor. Lift your hips and back off the floor until your body forms a straight line from your shoulders to your knees. Hold for five to 10 seconds. Lower to the floor and repeat 10 to 12 times.

    Hints: Squeeze your glutes at the top of the movement, and don’t let your spine sag.
    Make it Harder: Straighten one leg once your hips are lifted.


    Metronome

    What it Hits: Obliques

    Lie faceup on the floor with your knees bent and raised over your hips, with your ankles parallel to the ground, your feet lifted, and your arms extended outward. Rotate your legs to the left side, bringing your knees as close to the floor as possible without touching. Return to the center, then move your knees to the right side. Do 10 to 12 reps on each side.

    Hints: Make sure not to swing your hips or use momentum; start the movement from your core and continue to move slowly from side to side. Make it Harder: Keep your legs straight.


    Plank Lift

    What it Hits: Transversus abdominis and lower back

    Begin facedown on the floor, propped up on your forearms, with knees and feet together. With your elbows under your shoulders, lift your torso, legs, and hips in a straight line from head to heels. Hold for 10 seconds. Raise your right leg a few inches, keeping the rest of the body still. Lower and repeat with your left leg.

    Hints: Pull in your belly and don’t let your hips sag.
    Make it Harder: Extend the time of the exercise. Each time you lift your leg, hold it for 15 to 20 seconds.


    Side Plank

    What it Hits: Obliques, transverses abdominis, lower back, hips and glutes.

    Lie on your right side, supporting your upper body on your right forearm, with your left arm at your left side. Lift your hips and keeping your body weight support on the forearm and the side of the right foot, extend your left arm above your shoulder. Hold this position for 10 to 30 seconds. Switch sides and repeat.

    Hints: Keep your hips up; don’t let them sag.
    Make it Harder: Support your upper body with your right hand, instead of your forearm.


    Floor Crunch

    What it Hits: Rectus Abdominis, transverse abdominis

    Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Place hands so that your fingers are by your ears (rather than cupping your head in your hands). Contract the abs and curl forward to lift both shoulders off the floor without tucking your chin to your chest (keep chin pointing up). Hold for two counts and then lower. Do two sets of 10 to 12 repetitions.

    Hints: Keep stomach tight and tucked in
    Make it Harder: Grab two cans from the pantry and hold onto to add resistance.


    Bicycle Crunch

    What it Hits: Rectus abdominis, external obliques and internal obliques.

    Lie on your back, knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and hands on the sides of your head. Contract your abdominal muscles as you bring your knees up to a 45-degree angle. Straighten and bend your knees as you alternate crossing and touching right elbow to left knee, then left elbow to right knee. Do two sets of 10 to 12 repetitions for each leg.

    Hints: Make sure to keep a straight back.
    Make it Harder: Do the entire motion in slow motion.

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  • Stretching Program

    This packet is designed for education to prevent injury and to promote health. If you experience an injury you should consult with your physician for proper care and treatment. The physicians and physical therapists at K-Valley Orthopedics specialize in sports medicine injuries and understand your desire to maintain an active, healthy lifestyle. Call 269-343-8170 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

     

    Guidelines for Stretching: The key to stretching is consistency over the long haul. You will get more benefit from doing a few minutes each day, rather than spending half an hour one to two days a week. When you stretch you should keep the muscles relaxed and only pull to where you feel a gentle stretch. Do NOT strain. If you pull to hard the muscles will automatically tighten to protect against a muscle tear and you will not improve your muscle length. Do not bounce and remember to relax and breathe easily while stretching.

    Hold each stretch for 30 seconds and repeat twice. Do 1-2 x a day.

    ITB: This is a large tendon which starts at the top of your hip and pelvis and runs down along the outside of your leg and inserts along the side of your knee and shin. Use a rope or dog leash to assist this stretch. Lie on your back and place a loop around the involved foot. With your knee straight, first raise the leg straight up until you have reached waist height and then pull your leg across your body. Keep your back and shoulders flat on the floor the entire time.

    Hip Flexors: These muscles start from the lower spine and the top of the pelvis and insert onto the thigh and knee. Start in a half-kneeling position, with the leg you are stretching behind you. Keep your back straight and lean your hips forward until you feel a gentle stretch across the front or your hip. Do NOT overstretch.

    Quadriceps: This is a group of muscles along the front of the thigh. Stand with your back straight, pull your heel toward your buttock until a gentle stretch is felt across the front of your thigh. If you do not feel a stretch, tighten your butt muscles to increase the pull on the front of your thigh.

    Piriformis: This is a small muscle which runs from your sacrum to your hip. Laying on your back, with one hand pull your knee up toward your opposite shoulder and with the other hand pull your ankle toward your opposite shoulder until a gentle stretch is felt along your hip and buttock region.

    Adductor Stretch: This is the large group of muscles along the groin or inner thigh area. Sit with your legs yoga style but with the bottoms of your feet together rather than crossed, push out on your knees until a gentle stretch is felt along the back of your thigh. Standing with your heel up on a stool, keep your back straight, push your butt back, straighten your knee and pull your toes up until you feel a gentle stretch along the back of your leg.

    Gastrocnemius: This is the large muscle along the back of your calf. Position your back leg with knee straight, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Position your front leg with knee bent, foot flat, toes pointed straight ahead. Lean forward until you feel a gentle pull in the calf muscles of the back leg.

    Soleus: This is a smaller muscle of the calf that lies under the gastrocnemius. Position your back leg with knee slightly bent, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Position your front leg with knee bent, heel flat on the floor, toes pointed straight ahead. Lean forward until a gentle stretch is felt in the muscles of your calf on the back leg.

    Hamstrings: This is a large muscle group along the back of the thigh. Place heel on a chair with your toes pulled up towards you, knee straight and push your hips and butt, backwards. Keep your back up straight, DO NOT bend over at the back.

    IT Band: This is a large strap like muscle and tendon that runs from the hip to the knee. Cross right leg over left, stick left hip out to the side, bring left arm up over the top of your head. Repeat the same to the other side.

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  • Fast Abs

    By Alyssa Shaffer

    A generation ago, you’d be hard-pressed to find elite runners paying attention to their abs. Today, it’s practically mandatory. “Our coaches drill the importance of core conditioning into our heads,” Says world champion hurdler Lolo Jones. “We’re at it all the time.” That’s because scientists and coaches now know that you can’t run your best without a strong core, the muscles in your abdominals, lower back, and glutes. They provide stability, power, and endurance that runners need for powering up hills, sprinting to the finish, and maintaining efficient form mile after mile. “When your core is strong, everything else will follow,” says Greg McMillan, a running coach in Flagstaff, Arizona, who has worked with scores of elite and recreational runners. It’s the foundation for all of your movement, no matter what level of running you’re doing.

    The key is to train your core like a specialist. Experts have mapped out precisely how the movements of running draw on the strength and stability of the glutes, obliques, and ab muscles that lie deep beneath the six-pack. They’ve learned how essential it is for runners to engage these muscles to finish fast, reduce pain, and hang tough on long runs. Best of all, they’ve tailored workouts to help them do that.

    All runners – from those rehabbing injuries to elite gunning for PRs-can benefit from this detailed approach. “When all the muscles involved in running are supported, and the muscles in the hips and trunk work together you don’t get as many injuries and can enjoy running more,” says Phil Wharton, a musculoskeletal therapist and co-owner of Wharton Performance Group in New York and the Wharton Health Experience in Flagstaff.

    Quality core work isn’t easy. But it doesn’t require more than 15 minutes a few times a week-an investment that will pay dividends on the road. Just ask Lolo Jones. Even in the off-season, she’s working her core three times a week so that when she races, she’ll have the stamina to retain her status as America’s top hurdler. “When my core strength is at its peak,” says Jones, “I can run more efficiently and maintain the extra edge.

    Here’s How Your Core Works For You On The Road

    Speed. As you enter your stride or quicken the rate of your leg and foot turnover when you’re trying to pick up your pace, the lower abs-including the transverses and rectus abdominis- and lower back are called into action. The stronger and more stable these muscles are, the more force and speed you can generate as you push off the ground.


     

    Uphills

    The glutes and lower abs support the pelvis, which connects to the leg muscles needed to get uphill. If the core is strong, the legs will have a stable plane to push fro, for a more powerful ascent. When you swing your leg forward, the hip-flexor muscles, such as the rectus femoris, pull on the pelvis. As you push off the ground, the glutes and hamstrings are engaged.


     

    Downhills

    When you’re flying down a slope, you need strong gluteal muscles to help absorb the impact and counter the momentum of the forward motion. As fun as it may be to zoom down, without the core strength to control your movement, your quads and knee joints bear the extra pounding of your body weight, which can lead to fatigue, pain, and even injury.


     

    Endurance

    As you’re nearing the end of a race, a solid core helps you maintain proper form and run efficiently, even through fatigue. With strong lower abs and lower- back muscles, such as the erector spinae, it’s easier to stay upright. If your core is weak, you may end up shuffling, slouching, and putting too much stress on your hips, knees, and shins.


     

    Lateral Movement

    Whenever you have to suddenly move to the side-to turn the corner on a track, dodge a pothole, or navigate undulating terrain-the obliques provide stability and help keep you upright. If your core is weak, then you may end up leaning into the movement, which can put excess weight and strain on the joints in your legs and feet.

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  • Basic Strength Training Exercises

    Basic Strength Training Exercises


    Single Leg Squat
    Squat down on one foot until your leg is bent about 50 degrees; push back up. "Keep your hips even, and your knee over your foot," says coach Bob Larsen. Once you've mastered the move, add dumbbells (start with 5 pounds).

    Repetition: 2 sets of 10; build to 2 sets of 12

    What it Works: Quads and glutes

    Heel Raises
    Stand on a curb or platform with your heels over the edge. Lift up onto your toes, raise one foot and slowly lower. Once you have the move down, add dumbbells (start with 5 pounds).

    Repetition: 1 set of 8; build to 3 sets of 15

    What it Works: Calf muscles and Achilles tendon

    Wood Chop
    Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, holding a 5 to 8 pound ball in your hands. Squat down with the ball between your knees, keeping your heels on the floor, sticking your butt out, and not letting your knees go more than a few inches toward your toes. Return
    to standing, raising the ball overhead, maintaining a slight bend in your knees. Keep your core engaged the whole time, as if bracing for a punch. Do two or three sets of 12 to 15 reps; increase weight of the medicine ball when you can do 15 in good form

    Repetition: 2 to 3 sets of 12 to 15 reps; increase weight of the medicine ball when you can do 15 in good form.

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  • Dynamic Flexibility & Mobility

    Dynamic movements are the best way to prepare your body for dynamic workouts.  Contrary to old beliefs, the best time to work on static flexibility is at the end of your workout, and not in the beginning.  After every workout you should follow a 4-6 minute total body static stretching series.The following dynamic stretches will help develop you flexibility, balance, coordination, mobility and strength.

    Walking High Knees

     

    Purpose:  to flex the hips and shoulders, and stretch the glutes, quads, lower back and shoulders.

    Procedure:

    1. Take an exaggerate high step, driving your knee as high as possible and simultaneously push up on the toes of your opposite foot.
    2. Use the proper arm swing; 90° angle at the elbows, hands sing up to chin level and back beyond rear pocket.

    Key Points: Drive your knees up as high as possible.

    Variation - High knees pull: Same as above, but grab your knee and pull it up and in with each stride.

    Arm Swings

     

    Purpose: to relax and loosen the arms, upper and lower back.

    Procedure:

    1. Stand tall, feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart, with knees slightly bent.
    2. Hold arms out to the side.
    3. Slowly swing arms back and forth across the front of your body.
    4. Repeat this continuous motion for a minimum of 30 seconds.

    Key Points:
    Keep back straight at all times.

    Variation:  Overhead/down and back – swing both arms continuously to an overhead position and then forward, down and backwards.

    Side Bends

    Purpose: Wakes up the breathing muscles in the front and side of the chest and releases tension in the shoulders.

    Procedure:

    1. Stand tall with good posture, feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart, knees slight bent with hands resting on hips.
    2. Lift your trunk up and away from your hips and bend smoothly first to one side, then the other, avoiding the tendency to lean either forwards or backwards.
    3. Repeat the whole sequence sixteen times with a slow rhythm, breathing out as you bend to the side, and in as you return to the center.

    Key Points:
    Always try to avoid leaning forwards or backwards, stay centered.
    Variation: Place a toning bar on your shoulders and do same motion as above.

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  • How to Use The Stick

    The Stick is a revolutionary device used to segmentally compress and stretch muscle. It is highly effective in the treatment of muscle pain and trigger points.

    The Stick provides the following benefits:
     

    • Prevent & Predict Muscle Injuries
    • Dramatically improve strength, flexibility and endurance
    • Rapidly prepare muscles for physical activity
    • Disperse the effects of lactic acid following activity
    • Accelerate muscle recovery
    General Tips for Use

    • Keep muscles relaxed during rollout
    • Use on skin or through light clothing.
    • The Stick is waterproof and designed to bend without fear of breaking.
    • It is not necessary to hurt the muscle in order to help the muscle.
    • Most effective when used before, during and after periods of activity.
    • For pin-point rollout, slide hands onto spindles.
    • Excessive use may caue muscle soreness.

    General Instructions

    • A typical warm-up for healthy muscle tissue is about 20 progressively deeper passes over each muscle group (about 30 seconds per area).
    • Discomfort or pain is experienced when the spindles locate a bump or tender knot in the muscle - this is known as a trigger point.
    • Muscles containing trigger points are often weak, stiff and sore. They are frequently tight, easily tire and often hurt.
    • Muscles containing chronic trigger points need 20 additional passes over the involved area, and may require attention several times daily.
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